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41. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 14
John Hicks An Aesthetics of the Given in Rei Terada’s Looking Away
42. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 14
Yubraj Aryal Modernisms
43. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Daniel W. Smith On the Nature of Concepts
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In What is Philosophy?, Deleuze and Guattari define philosophy, famously, as an activity that consists in forming, inventing, and fabricatingconcepts.” But this definition of philosophy implies a somewhat singular “analytic of the concept,” to borrow Kant’s phrase. One of the problems it posesis the fact that concepts, from a Deleuzian perspective, have no identity but only a becoming. This paper examines the nature of this problem, arguing thatthe aim of Deleuze analytic is to introduce the form of time into concepts in terms of what he calls “continuous variation” or “pure variability.” The aim isnot to rediscover the eternal or the universal, but to find the conditions under which something new is produced (creativeness).
44. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Satwik Dasgupta The Anthropocentric Vision: Aesthetics of Effect and Terror in Poe’s “Hop-Frog”
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The Anthropocentric Vision: Aesthetics of Effect and Terror in Poe’s ‘Hop-Frog’” develops the possible psycho-social results of emotional hegemony through a semi-anthropoid figure who avenges himself on a king desperate to assert and sustain supremacy over his subjects. This essay juxtaposes modern anthropological study and Poe’s fiction; it demonstrates that an anthropocentric study of the author’s aesthetics of terror in “Hop Frog” reveals that what we see and perceive as essential to the titular character’s poetics of revenge and hatred are nothing but a reflection of our (the readers’) own anthropocentrism. This anthropocentric study provides a glimpse into how humans perceive, adapt, and conquer adversarial forces within the society. However, the collapse of the apparent rational order, effected by Hop Frog at the end, also provides a glimpse into the nether side of human consciousness and its illimitable capacity to defy comprehension.
45. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Yubraj Aryal Affective Politics: A Sovereign Way of Cultivating and “Caring of the Self”
46. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Dr Bram Ieven Alain Badiou and the Future of Communism
47. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Iswari P. Pandey Kali, Clodia, and the Problem of Representation
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Re-presenting the historically silenced subjects is among the trickiest negotiations a researcher has to enter, especially when working with ancient texts. This essay uses a quasi-experimental, reader’s-response approach to academic writing to spotlight the problem of “recovering” marginalized subjects from across cultures and (pre-) histories. The major thrust of the inquiry is the rhetorical challenge of representing silenced or marginalized subjects in revisionary work. Weaving together personal reflections and academic arguments, the essay presents the process of scholarly research as a heuristic for formulating arguments. The essay also proposes–and demonstrates–a process-based approach that takes into account researcher’s positionality.
48. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Yubraj Aryal Affective Turn
49. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Contributors
50. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Notice to Contribution
51. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Michael Y. Bennett Trajectories: Mapping Rhizomes
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This “experimental” essay both investigates maps and functions as a map. Taking its cue from the Deleuzean rhizome, this essay proposes a new method of inquiry based upon the Scientific Method. This essay works as a series of displacements. Each piece of new evidence will take the paper in a different direction. After each piece of evidence is introduced, it will be my job to draw conclusions about the displacement. This inquiry works like a Deleuzean map.
52. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Dr. Áine Kelly Lost Intimacy
53. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Paul Patton Bio-power and Non-sovereign Rights
54. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Adolfo C. Amaya Regimes of Cannibality: A Peripheral Perspective on War, Colonization and Culture
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The present article aims at postulating cannibalism as a fundamental axis for the analysis of the processes of subjectivation of Spanish America since the 15th century. The hypothesis is that this process has gone through three stages, which allow for the delimitation of the differences of what I shall refer to, for now, as regimes of cannibalism understood as subjectivation processes:(i) Anthropophagic or of ritual war.(ii) Mimetic or of colonial incorporation(iii) Iconic or of mediatic absorption, at a global level.In order to construct the regimes of cannibalism as a concept I have chosen to use two perspectives: the one which speaks of the ritual experimentation of anthropophagy from the inside and the one which moves through the variants of that double desire for the other’s desire that makes every process of colonization possible; in the known forms of territorial annexation, incorporation (productive, spiritual, institutional) and absorption by the global system of mediatization.
55. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Dr. Shiva Rijal Absurd, Parables and Double-Reed Flute
56. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Notice to Contribution
57. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Sandor Goodhart “The Self and Other People: Reading Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation with René Girard and Emmanuel Levinas”
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In the interest of moving conflict resolution toward reconciliation, theorists have turned to René Girard whose understanding of scapegoating and imitative desire acquires special importance. But Girardian thinking offers no unique ethical solution, and so theorists have turned to Emmanuel Levinas for such an account. Four ideas especially from Levinas appear helpful: his criticism of totality (and, concomitantly, his substitution of the idea of the infinite); the face as an opening (or gateway) to the infinite; the Other (or other individual) and my infinite (or unlimited) responsibility toward her (or him); and language as the dire as opposed to the dit, the saying (or “to say”) as opposed to the said, as one modality in which this openness to the other individual takes place. Combining Girard’s analysis of the sacrificial with Levinas’s analysis of the ethical may offer conflict resolution theorists an account as thoroughgoing and as old as Biblical scripture, and one to which, in the interest of moving toward reconciliation, they would do well to pay heed.
58. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Tammy Lynn Castelein On Foucault’s Last Philosophical Testament
59. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Contributors
60. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Darrell Arnold Hegel and Ecologically Oriented System Theory
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Building on the views of Kant and early nineteenth century life scientists, Hegel develops a view of systems that is a clear precursor to the developments in Ludwig von Bertalanffy’s general system theory, as well as the thinking of the ecologically minded system thinkers that built upon the foundation Bertalanffy laid. Hegel describes systems as organic wholes in which the parts respectively serve as means and ends. Further, in the Encyclopedia version of the logic Hegel notes that such systems are comprised of three processes: gestalt, the process of assimilation, and regeneration. In Hegel’s texts, he describes both natural and social systems as organic wholes with such systematic processes. In this paper, these processes and systems are described and it is argued that Hegel quite consistently applies views developed in the logic when describing systems. The paper shows how this parallels later developments in systems theory and goes on to show some distinctions between Hegel’s view of systems and that of later ecologically minded system thinkers.