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41. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Michael Y. Bennett Trajectories: Mapping Rhizomes
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This “experimental” essay both investigates maps and functions as a map. Taking its cue from the Deleuzean rhizome, this essay proposes a new method of inquiry based upon the Scientific Method. This essay works as a series of displacements. Each piece of new evidence will take the paper in a different direction. After each piece of evidence is introduced, it will be my job to draw conclusions about the displacement. This inquiry works like a Deleuzean map.
42. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Dr. Áine Kelly Lost Intimacy
43. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Paul Patton Bio-power and Non-sovereign Rights
44. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Adolfo C. Amaya Regimes of Cannibality: A Peripheral Perspective on War, Colonization and Culture
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The present article aims at postulating cannibalism as a fundamental axis for the analysis of the processes of subjectivation of Spanish America since the 15th century. The hypothesis is that this process has gone through three stages, which allow for the delimitation of the differences of what I shall refer to, for now, as regimes of cannibalism understood as subjectivation processes:(i) Anthropophagic or of ritual war.(ii) Mimetic or of colonial incorporation(iii) Iconic or of mediatic absorption, at a global level.In order to construct the regimes of cannibalism as a concept I have chosen to use two perspectives: the one which speaks of the ritual experimentation of anthropophagy from the inside and the one which moves through the variants of that double desire for the other’s desire that makes every process of colonization possible; in the known forms of territorial annexation, incorporation (productive, spiritual, institutional) and absorption by the global system of mediatization.
45. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Dr. Shiva Rijal Absurd, Parables and Double-Reed Flute
46. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Notice to Contribution
47. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Sandor Goodhart “The Self and Other People: Reading Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation with René Girard and Emmanuel Levinas”
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In the interest of moving conflict resolution toward reconciliation, theorists have turned to René Girard whose understanding of scapegoating and imitative desire acquires special importance. But Girardian thinking offers no unique ethical solution, and so theorists have turned to Emmanuel Levinas for such an account. Four ideas especially from Levinas appear helpful: his criticism of totality (and, concomitantly, his substitution of the idea of the infinite); the face as an opening (or gateway) to the infinite; the Other (or other individual) and my infinite (or unlimited) responsibility toward her (or him); and language as the dire as opposed to the dit, the saying (or “to say”) as opposed to the said, as one modality in which this openness to the other individual takes place. Combining Girard’s analysis of the sacrificial with Levinas’s analysis of the ethical may offer conflict resolution theorists an account as thoroughgoing and as old as Biblical scripture, and one to which, in the interest of moving toward reconciliation, they would do well to pay heed.
48. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Tammy Lynn Castelein On Foucault’s Last Philosophical Testament
49. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Contributors
50. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Darrell Arnold Hegel and Ecologically Oriented System Theory
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Building on the views of Kant and early nineteenth century life scientists, Hegel develops a view of systems that is a clear precursor to the developments in Ludwig von Bertalanffy’s general system theory, as well as the thinking of the ecologically minded system thinkers that built upon the foundation Bertalanffy laid. Hegel describes systems as organic wholes in which the parts respectively serve as means and ends. Further, in the Encyclopedia version of the logic Hegel notes that such systems are comprised of three processes: gestalt, the process of assimilation, and regeneration. In Hegel’s texts, he describes both natural and social systems as organic wholes with such systematic processes. In this paper, these processes and systems are described and it is argued that Hegel quite consistently applies views developed in the logic when describing systems. The paper shows how this parallels later developments in systems theory and goes on to show some distinctions between Hegel’s view of systems and that of later ecologically minded system thinkers.
51. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Robert JC Young Interventions: Postcolonial, Agency and Resistance
52. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Kelly Oliver Deconstructing “Grown versus Made”: A Derridean Perspective on Cloning
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In this essay, I consider what happens to debates over genetic enhancement when we “deconstruct” the opposition between “grown and made” and the notion of freedom of choice that comes with it. Along with the binary grown and made comes other such oppositions at the center of these debates: chance and choice, accident and deliberation, nature and culture. By deconstructing the oppositions between grown versus made (chance versus choice, or accident versus deliberate), and free versus determined, alternative routes through these bioethical thickets start to emerge.
53. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Johanna Drucker Stéphane Mallarmé’s Un Coup de Dés and the Poem and/as Book as Diagram
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Modern poetics takes one crucial turn through Ezra Pound’s notion of the “ideogram,” a concept that had a lasting impact through the Imagists andtheir influence. The ideogram borrows from Pound’s ideas about Chinese characters, their ability to condense complex representation into a figuredform in an economic but resonant image. By contrast, the compositional technique embodied in French poet Stéphane Mallarmé’s unique work, UnCoup de Dés, can be characterized as “diagrammatic,” driven by semantic relations expressed spatially in a distributed field. This essay explores thatdiagrammatic work and it implications as a compositional technique.
54. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Yubraj Aryal Unoriginal Genius/Conceptual Writing: Recovering Avant-Garde in the Contemporary Poetics
55. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Paul Redding Leibniz and Newton on Space, Time and the Trinity
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G. W. Leibniz was a philosopher caught up in both the scientific and theological disputes of his day. Here I argue that a set of common concerns underlay hisengagement within two seemingly very different disputes: that with Newton over the nature of space and time, and that with Socinians over the Christian doctrineof the Trinity.First, Leibniz’s objections to Newton’s conception of space and time were linked to his objection to Newton’s model of the mind with which they was linkedbecause of Newton’s attempt to find support for his notions of absolute space and time by treating them as attributes of an infinitely extended immaterial God.Significantly, Newton had himself been a defender of the anti-trinitarian heresy of Arianism, and Leibniz’s alternative model of mindedness was in turn tied tohis trinitarian theology, as he saw the idea of three persons in one God as providing a model for human self-consciousness in which the identity of thereflecting and reflected upon thinking subject must be maintained. We can see within Leibniz’s triune model of self-consciousness the kernel of laterintersubjective models of human intentionality developed within the period of German Idealism.
56. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Dr. Vernon W. Cisney Toward a Deleuzian Ethics: Value without Transcendence
57. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 17
Martin Savransky A Becoming Together of the World: The Cosmopolitics of Isabelle Stengers
58. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 17
Yubraj Aryal Writing/Body: Symbolic as a Political Act in a New Way
59. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 17
Yubraj Aryal Between the Political Animality and the Animality Political
60. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 17
Mihaela P. Harper Bewilderingly, Forcefully: Drawing the Line Outside
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This article examines the difference between two concepts of critical importance to the philosophical frameworks of Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze–pleasure and desire–through the troubling and troubled figure of suicide. My contention is that, in the work of both thinkers, suicide makes legible an affirmative impulsion and a mode or tekhnē (in both senses of the term: practice and art) of encountering an unforeseeable virtuality (the Outside). Of aesthetic and ethical significance, this mode is experimental and dangerous, a frequency of passion, situated between pleasure and desire. Souci de soi (the care of the self) and a line of flight, I suggest, coincide in suicide, “an art that it takes a lifetime to learn.”