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61. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Dru McGill Archaeological Ethics Education in the University: A View from an Early Career Instructor
62. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Mary Brydon-Miller Addressing the Ethical Challenges of Community-Based Research
63. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Regina Wentzel Wolfe, Stephen M. Wolfe Chronicles of a Financial Crisis: Causes and Ethical Dimensions
64. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Jennifer McCafferty, Reid Cushman, Kenneth W. Goodman, Paul Braunschweiger, Robin N. Fiore New NSF And NIH Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) Guidelines: A Three-Phase Plan
65. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Douglas Adams The Issues and Challenges of Research Ethics Education in the University, Particularly in the Area of the Social Sciences
66. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Michael S. Pritchard Teaching Research Ethics Across the Curriculum: An Institutional Change Model
67. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Dena Plemmons Challenges for Research Ethics Education in the Social Sciences
68. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Cynthia Jones Instructor Disclosure and Theory Diversity in Teaching Professional Ethics
69. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Matthew W. Keefer, Michael Davis Curricular Design And Assessment In Professional Ethics Education: Some Practical Advice
70. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Jack Breslin Doing Ethics in Media: Theories and Practical Applications by Jay Black & Chris Roberts
71. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Christopher Mayer The Possibility of Character Development
72. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
David K. McGraw, Daphyne Thomas- Saunders, Morgan Benton, Jeffrey Tang, Amanda Biesecker Who Teaches Ethics? An Inquiry into the Nature of Ethics as an Academic Discipline
73. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Jay Sweifach Conscientious Refusal in Schools of Social Work: Rights, Remedies, and Responsibilities
74. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Jan Leach Journalism Ethics: A Philosophical Approach by Christopher Meyers, Editor
75. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Kathleen M. Szczepanek Business Ethics: How to Develop Ethical Awareness and Introspection in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students
76. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Alexander J. Schloss Bioethics: A Vehicle for Interdisciplinary Learning Between Dental and Nursing Students
77. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Tony DeCesare On the Potential Contributions of High School Philosophy to Ethical and Democratic Education
78. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Charles B. Shrader, Susan P. Ravenscroft, Jeffrey B. Kaufmann, Timothy D. West Classroom Cheating and Student Perceptions of Ethical Climate
79. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 15 > Issue: 1
Maughn Gregory Introduction: Ethics Education as Philosophical Practice: The Case from Socratic, Critical, and Contemplative Pedagogies
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John Dewey wrote of moral education as growth from impulsive behavior to a “reflective morality,” involving the pursuit of ends-in-view identified through practices of critical reflection and social interaction. The essays in this section explore a variety of such practices as a philosophical approach to K–12 ethics education. The essays draw on, and contribute to three educational movements that aim for particular kinds of reflective consciousness and agency. Socratic Pedagogy engages students in problematizing the status quo, inquiry to identify truth, and self-correction. Critical Pedagogy utilizes school subjects to raise students’ political awareness and as methods of political inquiry and agency. Contemplative Pedagogy introduces practices of mindfulness to help students cultivate curiosity and attention and to bring personal insight to bear on their studies. Teaching ethics as a series of philosophical practices helps students and teachers become more sensitive to ethical meaning and skillful in ethical inquiry and agency.
80. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 15 > Issue: 1
Michelle Ciurria The Meaning(s) of Situationism
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This paper is about the meaning(s) of situationism. Philosophers have drawn various conclusions about situationism, some more favourable than others. Moreover, there is a difference between public reception of situationism, which has been very enthusiastic, and scholarly reception, which has been more cynical. In this paper, I outline what I take to be four key implications of situationism, based on careful scrutiny of the literature. Some situationist accounts, it turns out, are inconsistent with others, or incongruous with the logic of situationist psychology. If we are to teach students about situationism, we must first strive for relative consensus amongst experts, and then disseminate the results to philosophical educators in various fields.