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61. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Danielle Macbeth Reading Begriffsschrift
62. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Zoë Sachs-Arellano Starting Points: An interview with Hubert Dreyfus
63. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 1
Massimo Grassia Frege’s Criteria of Synonymy
64. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Erich H. Reck Frege on Numbers: Beyond the Platonist Picture
65. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
John P. Burgess Being Explained Away
66. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Robert B. Talisse Liberalism, Pluralism, and Political Justification
67. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Margaret Atherton Reading Lady Mary Shepherd
68. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Sean Dorrance Kelly Closing the Gap: Phenomenology and Logical Analysis
69. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Bas van Fraassen, Kenneth Walden On Taking Stances: An interview with Bas van Fraassen
70. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 15 > Issue: 1
Eugene Chislenko, Thomas Scanlon The Primacy of the Moral: An Interview with Thomas M. Scanlon
71. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 15 > Issue: 1
Sukjae Lee Passive Natures and No Representations: Malebranche’s Two “Local” Arguments for Occasionalism
72. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 15 > Issue: 1
Martha C. Nussbaum “Equal Respect for Conscience”: Roger Williams on the Moral Basis of Civil Peace
73. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 15 > Issue: 1
Kelly Oliver Tropho Ethics: Derrida’s Homeophatic Purity
74. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 15 > Issue: 1
Paul Skokowski Is the Pain in Jane Felt Mainly in Her Brain?
75. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 15 > Issue: 1
Marc Lange Laws and Meta-Laws of Nature
76. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 27
Nicholas Brown, Tadhg Larabee Editors' Introduction
77. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 27
Justin Wong Donna Jackson Nakazawa, The Angel and the Assassin: The Tiny Brain Cell that Changed the Course of Medicine
78. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 27
Justin Wong, Woojin Lim, Michelle Lara, Benjamin Simon, David Chalmers An Interview with David Chalmers
79. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 27
Romy Aran, Nathan Beaucage, Melissa Kwan, Peter Carruthers An Interview with Peter Carruthers
80. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 27
Eli Alshanetsky Making Our Thoughts Clear
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We often get clear on our thoughts in the process of putting them into words. I investigate the nature of this process by posing the question, “Do you know which thought you are trying to articulate, before successfully articulating it?” and rejecting two answers to the dilemma it yields. The first is that the answer is yes, and that articulation is either the recollection of prior knowledge or the mere acquisition of a skill or ability rather than of propositional knowledge. The second is that the answer is no, and that your thought is unknown in that it is not yet fully realized. Clarity, according to this response, is a metaphysical property of the thought rather than the thinker’s epistemic relation to it. I offer a third solution: you start out with implicit knowledge of your thought but lack explicit knowledge of it. The process of articulation moves you from implicit to explicit knowledge.