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81. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Sarah E. McFarland Of Bears and Women: The Ethics of Gender in Barry Lopez’s Arctic Dreams
82. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Lisa Kretz Peter Carruthers and Brute Experience; Descartes Revisited
83. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
C. Tucker, C. MacDonald Beastly Contractarianism?: A Contractarian Analysis of the Possibility of Animal Rights
84. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
David Boersema Review of The Road since Structure, by Thomas S. Kuhn, ed. James Conant and John Haugeland
85. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Darren Abramson Review of Rationality in Action, by John R. Searle
86. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Karim Dharamsi Review of Historical Ontology, by Ian Hacking
87. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
John Corcoran Review of Michael Dummett, by Bernhard Weiss
88. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Anthony Everett Review of Words Without Meaning, by Christopher Gauker
89. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Michael Goodman Review of Quintessence: Basic Readings From the Philosopyhy of W.V. Quine, ed. Roger F. Gibson, Jr.
90. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Stefano Franchi Review of Fearless Speech, by Michel Foucault, ed. Joseph Pearson
91. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Laura Duhan Kaplan, Ellyn Ritterskamp Review of Philosophy & This Actual World: An Introduction to Practical Philosophical Inquiry, by Martin Benjamin
92. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Richard D. Kortum Review of Mind, Value, and Reality, by John McDowell
93. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Joseph W. Koterski Review of Thomist Realism and the Linguistic Turn: Toward a More Perfect Form of Existence, by John P. O’ Callaghan
94. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Matthew McKeon Review of Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, by Ludwig Wittgenstein, trans. C. K. Ogden
95. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Brook J. Sadler Review of Natural Goodness, by Philippa Foot
96. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Steven Michel Review of The Shortest Shadow: Nietzsche’s Philosophy of the Two, by Alenka Zupancic
97. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
James E. Roper, David M. Zin Review of Rationality and Freedom, by Amartya Sen
98. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Steven Benko Ethics, Technology, and Posthuman Communities
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As long as technology has been interpreted as an expression of practical reasoning and an effort to alter the conditions of human existence, ethical language has been used to interpret and critique technology’s meaning. When this happens technology is more than implements that are expressions of human intelligence and used towards practical ends in the natural world.1 As Frederick Ferre points out, technology is always about knowledge and values—what people want and what they want to avoid—and to the extent that technology increases power, one has to ask whether technology and/or the use towards which it is put is ethical.2 The ethicality of technology is based on whether that technology threatens or enhances the good for human beings. Therefore, any understanding of technology is never removed from ethics. Beyond the ethical evaluation of technology, technology is critiqued in light of whether it enhances or diminishes what it means to be human.
99. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Peter H. Denton Introduction: On the Nature of Technology
100. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 6 > Issue: 1
Christine James Sonar Technology and Shifts in Environmental Ethics
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For a philosopher, the history of sonar technology is fascinating. During the first and second World Wars, sonar technology was primarily associated with activity on the part of the sonar technicians and researchers. Usually this activity is concerned with creation of sound waves under water, as in the classic “ping and echo”. The last fifteen years have seen a shift toward passive, ambient noise “acoustic daylight imaging” sonar. Along with this shift a new relationship has begun between sonar technicians and environmental ethics.