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81. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 6
Ellen Goldberg The Haṭhayogapradīpikā of Svātmārāma and the Rahasyabodhinī of Kṛpalvānanda
82. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 6
Klaus G. Witz Toward a Subjective Psychology Inspired by the Upanishadic Notion of Atman
83. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 6
Maria Marczewska-Rytko Science and Religion at the Threshold of a New Millennium
84. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 6
Kisor K. Chakrabarti AAtmatattvaviveka (Analysis of the Nature of the Self) An Annotated Translation: Reductio Arguments
85. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 6
Kenneth Holmqvist, Jaroslaw Pluciennik The Hebraic and the Indian Sublime from the Rhetoric Point of View
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In Hegel's 'Aesthetics', one can find a strong distinction between the Hebraic, true sublimity and the Indian, positive sublime. The main thesis of our article is that, from the rhetorical and cognitive point of view, the two sublimities do not form an opposition, although from the theological point of view they do. In order to affirm the thesis, we briefly analyze the main figures of the sublime as presented in Pseudo-Longinos' 'On the Sublime' and the concept of the sublime in Kant. According to our theory of the sublime, the Lyotardian formula of the sublime as 'presenting the unpresentable' should be expressed as 'representing the unimaginable'. When we examine the main examples of the Hebraic and the Indian sublime, we can easily see that in both literary cultures we can find a strong mimetic element as well as antimimetic evocation of the unimaginable. We identify the mimetic element in the sublime texts not only with space seen in accord with Kant but also with 'mimesis of emotion' which is regarded as the main form of mimesis in the ancient Greek tradition, for instance in Plato.
86. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 6
Jonathan C. Kramer The Subjective Experience of Time in Dhrupad, a Genre of North Indian Classical Music
87. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 6
Majid Amini Religious Discourse and Identity
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There is a widespread assumption that ethnic origins substantially contribute, if not constitute, the identity of individuals. In particular, among the ethnic elements, il is claimed that religion takes precedence and people could be individuated in terms of their religious affiliations. The purpose of this paper, however, is to show that strictly speaking identity cannot be constituted by religion. More precisely, it is argued that a phenomenological characterisation of individual identity fails to do justice to the philosophical requirements of identity. The argument is obviously philosophical by nature and is developed through an analysis of the concept of revelation. The phenomenon of revelation plays a pivotal role in the Judaic-Christian-Islamic tradition, yet by its very nature owes its authenticity to something prior to itself, namely, reason. This entails the priority of reason over revelation and as such undermines claims that purport to define identity in terms of revelation/religion. This detachment of identity from religion would clearly have far-reaching socio-political imphcations for issues such as diversity, pluralism and globahsation.
88. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 8
Kisor K. Chakrabarti AAtmatattvaviveka (Analysis of the Nature of the Self) An Annotated Translation: Auxiliaries
89. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 8
Michael Stoltzfus Our Fruitful Earth Buddhist Values for Moderation in Procreation
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Buddhist values emerge from a vision of interdependence, nonattachment, and moderation in all pursuits. This article is a reflection on these traditional Buddhist teachings within the context of the current crisis of overpopulation and environmental degradation. I highlight the implied link (present in many religious traditions), between spiritual piety and the production of progeny, and the Buddhist rejection of this link is investigated. More importantly, the Buddhist values that encourage moderation and responsibility regarding procreation are highlighted. Buddhism does not suggest that people should 'go forth and multiply,' just as it does not view humans a special creation by 'God' and therefore given 'dominion' over the natural world.
90. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 8
Ornan Rotem Some Observations on the Non-Ethical Dimensions of Karuṇā Arising from a Consideration of the Buddha's Decision to Teach
91. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 8
Murat Bac Truth-Making in A Cultural Context
92. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 8
Ron Geaves From Founder to Institution: Metaphors of Experience and the Sant Tradition
93. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 8
Guy Axtell Religious Pluralism and its Discontents
94. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 9
Michael C. Lazich The 'Term Question' Revisited Missionary Constructions of A Confucian Theology
95. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 9
Sukharanjan Saha Unestablished Probans in Nyaya
96. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 9
Leon Schlamm Ken Wilber's Spectrum Model: Identifying Alternative Soteriological Perspectives
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In this paper I identify two problematic strands of Wilber's transpersonal theory. Firstly, I question Wilber's claim that his spectrum model is supported by the materials of all the world's major mystical traditions, arguing that his integral, hierarchical perspective privileges some traditions, while distorting others. Drawing heavily upon Andrew Rawlins on's recent, taxonomic study of mystical traditions, which identifies four authentic routes to spiritual emancipation (Cool Structured, Cool Unstructured, Hot Structured and Hot Unstructured), I argue that while Wilber's model, itself Cool (the source of spiritual liberation hes within oneself) and Structured (developmental, hierarchical), provides a valuable cartography of transpersonal structures and states of consciousness, h cannot adequately handle the materials of the alternative, soteriological paths of Hot traditions (emphasising the numinous, and as other than oneself) and Unstructured traditions (affirming that there can be no gradual, or progressive, spiritual development at ah). Secondly, and more cursorily, in the light of this discussion, I argue that it is Wilber's Cool Structured perspective that informs his judgement that Jung is an elevationist. I demonstrate that Jung's psychic model of the conjunction of opposhes is a Hot Structured one, which provides an alternative, soteriological path for people whose spiritual needs are very different from those addressed by Wilber.
97. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 9
Donald Moores The Darkness of Enlightenment, the Effulgence of Agnosia: 'Cosmic' Epistemology in Wordsworth and Whitman
98. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 9
Kisor K. Chakrabarti AAtmatattvaviveka (Analysis of the Nature of the Self) An Annotated Translation: Usage about Non-entities
99. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 9
Thomas Forsthoefel Epistemologies of Religious Experience in Classical and Modern Advaita
100. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 21
Acknowledgement