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81. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 7
Zahra Abdollah Color in Islamic Theosophy: An Analytical Reading of Kubrā, Rāzī, Simnānī, and Kirmānī
82. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 8
Omar Moad Behind the Good, the Bad, and the Obligatory in al-Ghazālī’s al-Mustaṣfā min al-uṣūl
83. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 8
Benjamin G. Cook Ibn Sabʿīn and Islamic Orthodoxy: A Reassessment
84. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 8
Alexander Wain A Critical Study of Mabādiʾ ārāʾ ahl al-madīna al-fāḍila: The Role of Islam in the Philosophy of Abū Naṣr al-Fārābī
85. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 8
Aaron Spevack Disconnection and Doubt: Revisiting Schacht’s Theories of Ijtihād
86. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 8
Macksood Aftab Editorial
87. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 8
Matthew A. MacDonald Being-towards-God: Heidegger and the Relationship Between Man and God in Muslim Ritual Prayer
88. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 8
Contributors
89. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 8
Abbreviations of Journals and References
90. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 11
Aaron Spevack Editorial
91. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 11
Ozgur Koca The Idea of Causal Disproportionality in Said Nursi (1877-1960) and its Implications
92. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 11
Aaron Spevack The Qur’an and God’s Speech According to the Later Ashʿarī-Māturīdī Verifiers
93. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 11
Mehdi Aminrazvi Omar Khayyām on Theodicy: Irreconcilability of the Transcendental and the Imminent
94. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 11
Contributors
95. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 12
Contributors
96. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 12
Abbreviations of Journals and References
97. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 12
Ismail Lala Perceptions of Abraham’s Attempted Sacrifice of Isaac in the Latin Philosophical Tradition, the Sunnī Exegetical Tradition, and by Ibn ʿArabī
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Kierkegaard raises many issues in his account of the near sacri­fice of Isaac by his father. Responding to and critiquing Hegelian and Kantian depictions of Abraham, Kierkegaard moves to elevate Abraham into a position as a knight of faith. The Sunnī perception of the incident in the exegetical tradition is far more ethically unequivocal than that of the Latin philosophical tradi­tion. The ubiquitous Sufi theorist, Ibn ʿArabī, however, in a single act of interpretive ingenuity, managed to extirpate the central root of contention raised by the philosophers when he alleges that Abraham was only ever commanded to sacrifice a ram. Despite his abiding commitment to spiritual unveiling (kashf) and his insistence on the personal nature of God, Ibn ʿArabī advo­cates the employment of a Kantian criterion of universal ratio­nality to adjudicate between literal and metaphorical dreams.
98. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 12
Aaron Spevack Editorial
99. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 12
Kamal Shlbei Ṣadrā on Metaphysical Essentialism: The Unfolding of Existence and the Concealment of Essence
100. Journal of Islamic Philosophy: Volume > 12
Abdullah bin Hamid Ali Mustafa Akyol’s Reopening Muslim Minds: A Return to Reason, Freedom, and Tolerance