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81. Studi Internazionali di Filosofia: Volume > 4
Georges Gaal L’Esthétique: Logique et le problème de la reconnaissance des formes
82. Studi Internazionali di Filosofia: Volume > 5
Emile Namer Les conséquences religieuses et morales du système de Copernic: La place de l’homme dans l’univers infini de G. Bruno
83. Studi Internazionali di Filosofia: Volume > 5
Emile Namer La XXXIe Semaine de Synthèse à Paris
84. Studi Internazionali di Filosofia: Volume > 5
Pierre-Maxime Schuhl Descente métaphysique et ascension de l’âme dans la philosophie de Plotin
85. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Michel Seymour Une conception sociopolitique de la nation
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I submit what, I believe, is a fairly new definition of the nation, one which I call the sociopolitical conception. I try to avoid as much as possible the traditional dichotomy between the exclusively civic and ethnic accounts, and try to explain my reasons for doing so. I also adopt as a general framework a certain conceptual pluralism which allows me to use many different concepts of the nation. After that, I proceed by formulating some constraints on any acceptable new definition. My own sociopolitical conception is then finally introduced. The sociopolitical nation is a political community, most often composed, sociologically, of a national majority, national minorities, and individuals with other national origins. The concept of national majority is crucial for the account and refers to the largest sample in the world of a given population sharing a common language, history, and culture. National minorities are defined as extensions of neighbouring nations, while individuals of other national origins are those members of ethnic minorities that have come from immigration. There would be no sociopolitical nation if there were no national majority, but this is compatible with a pluricultural and multi-ethnic view of the nation, since the political community may also include national minorities and individuals with a different origin. lend the article by showing that this definition meets the constraints that were initially introduced.
86. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Donald Ipperciel L’idée de pathologie de la société chez Habermas
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Though Habermas explicitly rejected psychoanalysis as a model for a critical theory of society, it seems to have continued to shape his thought beyond the publication of Knowledge and Human Interests. The conceptual framework underlying his more recent social theory (Theory of Communicative Action,) would also be indebted to the psychoanalytical paradigm. This thesis is developed through the idea of the pathology of society, which represents the cornerstone of a specifically critical theory of society. In his demonstration, the author establishes a structural relationship between psychical and social organization, and between individual pathology and the diagnostic of modern societies.
87. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Jérôme Pelletier Actualisme et fiction
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The non-existence of fictional entities does not seem incompatible with their possible existence. The aim of this paper is to give an accornt of the intuitive truth of statements of possible existence involving fictional proper names in an actualist framework. After having made clear the opposition between a possibilist and an actualist approach of possible worlds, I distinguish between fictional individuals and fictional characters and between the fictional use offictional proper names and their metafictional use. On that basis, statements of possible existence involving fictional proper names appear to say of fictional characters conceived as abstact objects that they might have been exemplified.
88. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Madeleine Arsenault, Robert Stainton Holisme et homophonie
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We believe that, granting radical holism, a homophonie (or disquotational) definition of truth for a language achieves no progress towards guaranteeing the material equivalence of the left- and right-hand-side sentences for T-sentences. In order to avoid paradoxes such as the antinomy of the liar, Tarski requires that the metalanguage be semantically richer than the object language. For a radical holist, the difference in semantic powers of the meta- and object languages means that homophony is no guarantee of synonymy; therefore, worries about the indeterminacy of translation still apply.
89. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Golfo Maggini La première lecture heideggérienne de l'Éternel Retour
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This paper focuses on Heideggers 1937 lecture course on the Nietzschean doctrine of the Eternal Recurrence of the Same. Heidegger interprets the motive of recurrence in Nietzsche as the Moment (Augenblick) of the Eternal Recurrence. Through this key motive of the moment, we try then to examine the double function of the doctrine which, on the one hand, refers us back to some essential themes of the existential analytics, whereas, on the other hand, it paves the way for the new confrontation with metaphysics in the Beitrâge zur Philosophie. We hold that the turning away from the existential conception of the moment toward its “aletheiological” understanding in terms of a “site of the Moment” (die Augenblicksstàtte) takes place in the context of this very lecture course. This transition is even more critical as it constitutes the very heart of Heidegger s critique of subjectivity in the new perspective opened by the history of Being: Nietzsche's doctrine of time provides the basis for this questioning.
90. Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Marc Baratin Un danger en matière d'histoire de la linguistique: le fixisme