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81. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
David Jacobs Mark C. Vopat and Alan Tomhave, Business Ethics: The Big Picture
82. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 15 > Issue: 2
Tim Shiell Business Ethics: A Textbook with Cases, by William H. Shaw
83. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 8 > Issue: 1
Christina M. Bellon Ethics in the First Person
84. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Kaci Harrison Steve Broidy, A Case for Kindness: A New Look at the Teaching Ethic
85. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Zachary Auwerda Henry A. Giroux, On Critical Pedagogy
86. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 8
Dennis Weiss Are You a Machine?: The Brain, the Mind, and What It Means to Be Human
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Review of Sternberg’s Are Yout a Machine? an introduction to philosophy of mind which was begin as a high school project.
87. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 8
Wendy C. Turgeon The Secret of the Boat
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Review of two children’s books by McKinley, both aimed at younger (Kindergarten – Third Grade) readers.
88. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 19
Janice Moskalik Maughn Rollins Gregory and Megan Jane Laverty, editors, In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp: Childhood, Philosophy and Education
89. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 20
Eli Baum Review of Descartes’ Demon and the Eternal Key by Ali Gray
90. Questions: Philosophy for Young People: Volume > 20
Stephen Kekoa Miller Wendy C. Turgeon, Philosophical Adventures with Fairy Tales
91. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 30 > Issue: 2
David Wright Review of The Palgrave Handbook of Critical Thinking in Higher Education Part V “Critical Thinking and the Cognitive Sciences”
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This review essay discusses three articles from the Palgrave Handbook of Critical Thinking in Higher Education (eds. Martin Davies and Ronald Barnett) concerned with outlining the connection between cognitive science and critical thinking. All of the authors explain how recent findings in cognitive science, such as research on heuristics and cognitive biases (e.g. framing effects, the availability heuristic) might be incorporated into the critical thinking curriculum. The authors also elaborate on how recent findings in metacognition can reshape critical thinking pedagogy. For instance, the essays articulate how critical thinking instructors would be wise to broaden the scope of traditional critical thinking content by instructing students in the metacognitive strategies of self-regulation, cognitive monitoring, and evaluation in order to encourage better decision making both inside and outside the classroom.
92. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 30 > Issue: 2
Benjamin Hamby Review of Stephen Brookfield‘s Teaching for Critical Thinking
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Stephen Brookfield offers a distinctive conceptualization of and approach to teaching critical thinking. In this review I highlight some major aspects of his approach, and critique his baseline conception. I conclude that, while evaluating assumptions is an important aspect of critical thinking, it is not as important as Brookfield maintains. Instructors of critical thinking should read his book, but they should remain skeptical of its major substantive theoretical commitments.
93. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 31 > Issue: 2
Maria Sanders Review of The Palgrave Handbook of Critical Thinking in Higher Education
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This essay reviews five articles from Part VII in The Palgrave Handbook of Critical Thinking in Higher Education (Davies & Barnett, 2015) entitled “Social Perspectives on Critical Thinking.” In this section, the authors explore critical citizenship, critical pedagogy, and knowledge practices of critical thinking. It is a diverse collection of essays ranging from broad discussions on the topics included to specific applications and particular examples demonstrating criticality in higher education classrooms.
94. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 31 > Issue: 3
Jeffrey Maynes Review of Mercier and Sperber’s The Enigma of Reason
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In The Enigma of Reason, Hugo Mercier and Dan Sperber (2017) defend the proposal that reason is a specialized module which produces intuitions about reasons. Reason serves two functions: for individuals to justify their own judgments and actions to themselves and others, and to persuade others. In this review, I briefly summarize the central claims of the book, critically examine Mercier and Sperber’s arguments that reason is not a general faculty underlying our inferential abilities, and explore the pedagogical implications of their work.
95. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Lyudmyla Pustelnyk Intuition
96. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
David Charlton Intuition
97. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Felix Irmer Intuition
98. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Clifton F. Guthrie The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion by Jonathan Haidt
99. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Deni Elliott Hobbes: Prince of Peace by Bernard Gert
100. Teaching Ethics: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Michael Davis Hobbes by Bernard Gert