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1. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 11
Roberto Terzi La contamination et le retard: Phénoménologie de l’historicité et de la tradition chez Derrida
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Through an immanent reversal of Husserl’s approach to the problems of genesis, writing, and time, Derrida radicalizes the phenomenology of historicity in the direction of a contamination between the empirical and the transcendental. In this paper, I argue that this also entails a transformation of the very concept of tradition: every tradition is always already tainted by the possibility of constitutional crisis and oblivion and it can only be questioned by thought after the historical fact. I conclude with an account of the general meaning of Derrida’s analysis of Husserl’s phenomenology, and indicate its importance for his later work.
2. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 11
Eric Pommier La phénoménologie de la vie de Renaud Barbaras
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Renaud Barbaras wants to show that only the concept of life can help us understand how the subject may be a condition as well as a part of the world. The failures of the former phenomenological theories on this point is due to “the ontology of death” they assume, which leads to separate the conscience and the body. It is thus required to realise an epochè of death so as to think the unity of the subject. Ultimately, Renaud Barbaras is led to define life from desire.
3. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 11
Grégori Jean Quand peut un corps? Corporéité, affectivité et temporalité chez Michel Henry
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One of Michel Henry’s major contributions to the phenomenology of the body consists in his proposal, based on his reading of Maine de Biran, to understand the subjective corporeity from the angle of the ability of action. Subjective corporeity acquires its ontological autonomy and its reality only through its own temporality. In reference to several unpublished texts, this article tries to clarify the nexus between ability and time, and thus to emphasize the crucial importance of the past for a “phenomenology of life”, in his paradoxical connection with the necessity to think a “coming in presence” of the world.
4. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 11
Claudia Șerban Fungierende Leiblichkeit: le rôle méthodologique du corps dans la phénoménologie de Husserl
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The phenomenological problem of the body (Leib) goes further than its treatment as a theoretical object, insofar as it concerns the meaning and the accomplishment of the phenomenological method itself. Both reduction and intuition, the two major poles of this method, imply in their specificity the reference to an operative corporeity (fungierende Leiblichkeit). The primordial sphere of absolute givenness cannot thus reduce the body proper without sacrificing the very principle that allows delimiting it. But this seems to lead to an unavoidable subjectivation of the phenomenological experience, whose model remains the object of perception (internal or external) and its ideal of intuitivity. In the last part of the paper it is however argued that corporeity is more than the resort of such a subjectivation, appearing also to be, within the framework of expression, the key to intersubjective comprehension.
5. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 11
François Jaran La phénoménologie face à la philosophie traditionnelle
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Phenomenology was born as an attack against the false constructions of traditional philosophy. Nevertheless, it soon discovered that it had an important bond to Plato’s, Descartes’ or Kant’s philosophical systems. As I show in this paper, both in Heidegger and in Husserl’s last writings, the philosophical endeavor is interpreted as a retrieval of earlier philosophical intentions. However, this does not lead them to a common interpretation of the meaning of philosophy’s history.
6. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 11
Jean Philippe Pierron La tradition vivante ou l’être affecté par le passé. Une lecture de Paul Ricoeur
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Modernity has always blamed the authority of tradition for hindering emancipation while at the same time affirming, for fear of abstraction, the creative energies of traditions. Can the Enlightenment’s abstract universal character be overcome without succumbing to the dogmatism of the appeal to Tradition? Paul Ricoeur’s philosophical project aims at surpassing this opposition by forging the concept of living tradition in which history and universal find a new articulation. This paper brings to light the originality of the dynamic relationship between present and past elaborated in Ricoeur’s philosophical hermeneutics.
7. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 2 > Issue: 3/4
Delia Popa Identité et unicité: variations du moi
8. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 2 > Issue: 3/4
Horaţiu Crişan Réduction et théorie transcendantale de la méthode dans la Sixième méditation cartésienne de fink
9. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 2 > Issue: 3/4
Ion Copoeru Hétérogénéité et constitution du champ sensible singulier
10. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 2 > Issue: 3/4
Natalie Depraz Qu’est-ce qu’une épochè naturelle?: Schütz, praticien de la phénoménologie
11. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 2 > Issue: 3/4
Delia Popa Dominique Janicaud In memoriam (1937-2002)
12. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1/2
Jocelyn Benoist Quelques remarques sur la doctrine brentanienne de l’évidence
13. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1/2
Bruce Bégout Percevoir et Juger: Le rôle de la croyance originelle (urdoxa) dans la théorie du jugement de Husserl
14. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1/2
Claudio Majolino Le différend logique: jugement et énoncé: Eléments pour une reconstruction du débat entre Husserl et Marty
15. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1/2
Victor Popescu Espace et mouvement chez Stumpf et Husserl: Une Approche Méréologique
16. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1/2
Pascal Chabot L’idéalité enchaînée: Husserl et la question des « mondes possibles »
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The aim of this paper is to show how the concept of “possible world”, that Husserl inherits from his study of logics, is capital for the understanding of his phenomenology. This concept is a fine tool that provides him a possibility to articulate the question of the physical and the cultural dimensions of some objects. A cultural object as a book or a painting has in fact two dimensions: a “material” one and a “spiritual” one. The author examines which are the relationships between those two dimensions. This question leads him to an interrogation on the genesis of the ideality of the cultural world. Is there not a contradiction between the ideality of the meaning and his historical genesis? In order to provide an answer to this question, the author suggests that one may use the notion of a “linked ideality”, i.e. ideal but linked up to the earth.
17. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1/2
Jean-Claude Gens L’esthétique Brentanienne Comme Science Normative
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According to Brentano, logic, ethics and aesthetics are practical normative sciences, and they correspond to the three classes of psychic phenomena. But if a judgment or a love may be correct or incorrect, it seems more difficult to speak of a correct representation as this class of phenomena ignores a polarity such as right / wrong or good / bad. Brentano speaks nevertheless from the aesthetical “value” of representations. Aesthetics could in this way be considered as part of a general theory of value; but compared to ethics the specificity of this science tends to vanish. Another way to consider the question is to remember that the distinction among the three classes of psychic phenomena is only formal. It means that one has to question more precisely the very nature of representation and especially its relation to feeling.
18. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1/2
Delia Popa Advenir à soi-même à partir de ce qui excède Claude Romano et l’aventure du sens
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The three books recently published by C. Romano reconsider the phenomenological senses of world and time starting from the event as original phenomena. This review-article explores the new method that he propose, called “evenimential hermeneutics”, as applied to the relation to ourselves, to the world and to the general sense of being. These analyses lean upon an original way of thinking time, as born in each “sudden” moment. The paper also draws comparisons with Heidegger, Husserl and Lévinas, while proposing a critical point of view on Romano’s thesis, concerning the relationship between the novelty of the event and the past, and its relation with desire and otherness.
19. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 4 > Issue: 1/2
Servanne Jollivet Heidegger, lecteur d’Aristote: Du mouvement à la mobilité dans l’herméneutique facticielle (1919-1924)
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Bringing back reflection to the mobility of the existence, a systematic re-appropriation of the Aristotelian concept of movement underlines the Heideggerian re-foundation of philosophy. Hence deconstructed and elaborated through “mobility”, the notion of movement constitutes the foundation stone that allows to play Aristotle against Aristotle and to contribute, via his hermeneutical reinvestment, to the “destruction” of the substantialist tradition.
20. Studia Phaenomenologica: Volume > 18
Olivier Malherbe Roman Ingarden: phénoménologie génétique et ontologie réaliste
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Roman Ingarden, one of Husserl’s most gifted students, devoted several thousand pages to the development of an ontological, epistemological, aesthetical and even anthropological framework that would allow him to firmly reject the so-called “idealistic turn” of his master Husserl. This paper aims at reconstructing an often overlooked side of his philosophy: his theory of consciousness and his analysis of the constitutive process involved in sense perception. After emphasizing the distinctive character of Ingarden’s ontological frame and its impact on understanding concepts as fundamental as consciousness or intentionality, this paper tries to sketch Ingarden’s answers to several genetic questions raised by Husserl: the relation between time and consciousness, the nature of the ultimate sense data and the question of motivation.